drawing-atmosphere:

Blondwood Biedermeier, Austria, 1843
It is curious how the contents of the vitrines are hidden from view by printed cotton curtains fitted insde the glass.

drawing-atmosphere:

Blondwood Biedermeier, Austria, 1843

It is curious how the contents of the vitrines are hidden from view by printed cotton curtains fitted insde the glass.

theluckydress:

Something Klimt slapped together for the walls of the dining room at Palais Stoclet. FFS.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoclet_Palace

theluckydress:

Something Klimt slapped together for the walls of the dining room at Palais Stoclet. FFS.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoclet_Palace

tierradentro:

Game of Chess" (with detail), 1839, Josef Danhauser.

One of my favorite Biedermeier period works from my visit to the Belvedere Museum. The recurring subject is the victory of women over man - not only represented on the chessboard, but also as an allegory with the statue of Queen Omphale with her slave and future husband, Hercules. And yes, all odds are that the handsome gentleman sitting at the piano is none other than Franz Liszt.

(Apparently, the painting depicts a real event - a chess match between a banker named Escales and a Hungarian noble woman. They played because the lover of the noble woman had a big debt to this banker and that was the way she could gain back the debts - which she managed to do. Check the full story here.)

Three Designs for Playing Cards

Austrian School, c. 1908
by Carl Otto Czeschka (1878-1969)
Gouache, pen, ink and graphite on off-white board

Czeschka began designing postcards and illustrations while he was still a student at the Academy (1894-99). The range of his work is typical for an artist in early twentieth century Vienna, when Decorative Arts became equal to Fine Arts. Czeschka painted frescoes, designed sets (King Lear for Max Rennhart), illustrated luxury editions, designed calendars, programs, ex libris, fonts for printing, interiors (Palais Stoclet), and the present playing cards. He was a member of the Vienna Secession and taught at the School of Applied Arts, where Oskar Kokoschka was one of his students.

Via Rita Bucheit, Ltd.


Clemens Wenzel von Metternich - Bertel Thorvaldsens

Clemens Wenzel von Metternich - Bertel Thorvaldsens

(Source: )

leikkona:

Candelabra “Minerva”France, First Empire (1804 - 1814)BronzeMusée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris

leikkona:

Candelabra “Minerva”
France, First Empire (1804 - 1814)
Bronze
Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris

(Source: lumeha)

art-culturei:

Koloman Moser

archiveofaffinities:

Koloman Moser, Plant Stand, 1904

archiveofaffinities:

Koloman Moser, Plant Stand, 1904

design-is-fine:

Koloman Moser, Beer Glass, Collection: For the Simple Household, 1899-1900. Made by Bakalowits & Söhne, Vienna, Austria. Via LACMA.

design-is-fine:

Koloman Moser, Beer Glass, Collection: For the Simple Household, 1899-1900. Made by Bakalowits & Söhne, Vienna, Austria. Via LACMA.

(Source: collections.lacma.org)

(Source: blakesolidstate)

uromancy:

Alfred Roller. Ver Sacrum. 1900.

uromancy:

Alfred Roller. Ver Sacrum. 1900.

hierarchical-aestheticism:

a Wiener Werkstätte exhibition.

design-is-fine:

Josef Hoffmann, vase, 1912. Glass. Vienna. Brooklyn Museum

design-is-fine:

Josef Hoffmann, vase, 1912. Glass. Vienna. Brooklyn Museum

(Source: )